sábado, 27 de septiembre de 2008

¿HRW sólo observa a Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, Corea del Norte...?



En el post que titulé “¿A qué le teme Chávez?”, sobre la expulsión del Director de Human Rights Watch de Venezuela, José Miguel Vivanco, varias personas dejaron valiosos comentarios críticos que dan motivo a un debate serio y con argumentos sobre la libertad de expresión, por ejemplo. Otros, tendenciosos como el comentario del señor Isaac Bigio que reproduzco: "HRW es parte de una red de organismos que se engranan con la estrategia del intervencionismo democrático, el cual promueve incursiones bélicas de EEUU en países a quienes pide democratizar. Londres. Isaac Bigio. SRTA VILLARAN QUE ESPERA PARA POSTULAR AL PPC. GANARIA DE CAJON". Se agradece "un consejo hasta de un conejo", pero no gracias. Estoy muy bien en Fuerza Social.

Como el tema de los derechos humanos es muy serio; como me he pronunciado pública y recientemente sobre la injusta detención de Roque Gonzales y en muchos casos más a lo largo de estos años; como defiendo al Instituto de Defensa Legal del incesante abuso del poder del gobierno de Alan García para intimidarlos; como Fuerza Social, el partido en el cual participo, los toma muy en serio, les copio a quienes se interesen genuinamente en el tema y tengan dudas respecto a la imparcialidad de esta institución, algunos títulos de informes y pronunciamientos recientes de HRW sobre la situación de los derechos humanos en los Estados Unidos y la afectación de los derechos humanos en otros países por los Estados Unidos. También, el resúmen de un Informe sobre "Los Desaparecidos" de Estados Unidos de esta organización.


1. Pronunciamientos y cartas



  • Detainee Legislation Clearly Outlaws “Alternative” Interrogation Techniques By Jennifer Daskal, advocacy director, US ProgramPublished in The Narragansett TimesJennifer Daskal, advocacy director, US Program comments on the Military Commissions Act and the so-called alternative interrogation methods which remain illegal.November 8, 2006

  • UN Human Rights Expert Critical of US Military Commissions Act On October 27, Martin Scheinin, the Special Rapporteur on the promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, issued a statement expressing concerns about the US Military Commissions Act of 2006. His concerns mirror those of Human Rights Watch. He also renewed his request to be invited to conduct a formal visit to the United States. The United States has not responded yet to the request he first made last July. Human Rights Watch urges the Bush administration to extend the invitation and to arrange meetings with high-ranking officials to discuss his concerns. Mr Scheinin’s statement is available here. October 30, 2006



  • Vice President Endorses Torture Cheney Expresses Approval of the CIA’s Use of WaterboardingU.S. Vice President Dick Cheney has issued the Bush administration’s first clear endorsement of a form of torture known as waterboarding, or mock drowning, said Human Rights Watch today.October 26, 2006



  • Military Commissions Act of 2006On September 28, the U.S. Congress passed the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA). Though its title refers to military commissions, the new legislation does much more than authorize and establish procedures for military tribunals of foreign terrorist suspects. As Congress’s first comprehensive foray into detainee policy, it affects an array of important issues, including the role of U.S. courts in protecting the fundamental rights of detainees, the implementation of the Geneva Conventions under U.S. law, and the prosecution of abuses by U.S. officials.October 16, 2006 Questions and Answers.



  • U.S.: Congress Should Reject Detainee Bill Denies Right of Habeas Corpus, Defines Enemy Combatant Too Broadly The U.S. Congress should vote down the draft military commissions and detainee treatment bill, Human Rights Watch said today. In denying the fundamental right of habeas corpus to detainees held abroad, defining “unlawful enemy combatants” in a dangerously broad manner, and limiting protections against detainee mistreatment, the bill would undermine the rule of law and America’s ability to protect its own citizens from unjust treatment at the hands of other governments.September 26, 2006



  • Senate Leaders Reject Explicit Redefinition of Geneva Conventions But Disappointing Compromise Weak on Enforcement, Eliminates Access to Courts for Victims of Abuse Key Republican Senators have rejected the Bush administration’s attempt to rewrite the humane treatment requirements of the Geneva Conventions, but have made key parts of the conventions effectively unenforceable, Human Rights Watch said today.September 22, 2006



  • Call Cruelty What It Is By Tom Malinowski, Washington Advocacy DirectorPublished in Washington Post President Bush is urging Congress to let the CIA keep using "alternative" interrogation procedures -- which include, according to published accounts, forcing prisoners to stand for 40 hours, depriving them of sleep and use of the "cold cell," in which the prisoner is left naked in a cell kept near 50 degrees and doused with cold water. September 18, 2006



  • An Alternative Set of Interrogation ProceduresBy Joanne Mariner, terrorism and counterterrorism directorPublished in FindLaw President Bush's speech last week on the CIA's secret detention program spared the nation the excrutiating details of torture. He spoke vaguely and euphemistically of an "alternative set of [interrogation] procedures" – "tough" and "necessary" tactics that made uncooperative detainees talk. President Bush wants it both ways: to justify torture, and to pretend that he's not. September 11, 2006



  • Congress Must Reject Ploy for Discredited TribunalsAdministration Seeks Immunity for Officials Authorizing Cruel, Inhuman Treatment The Bush administration introduced legislation yesterday that would recreate a system of fatally flawed military commissions akin to those that the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. The legislation would decriminalize the use of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment by civilian interrogators. If Congress were to pass this legislation into law, public attention could turn to the unfairness of the proceedings rather than to the alleged crimes of the suspect.September 7, 2006



  • Bush Justifies CIA Detainee Abuse Proposed Military Commissions Deeply FlawedPresident George W. Bush’s defense of abusing detainees betrays basic American and global standards, Human Rights Watch said today.September 6, 2006



  • HRW Responds to Questions from the Senate Armed Services CommitteeAfter the Supreme Court's June ruling that the military commissions created by President Bush to try alleged enemy combatants accused of war crimes were unlawful, Congress held hearings in July to explore the future of the military commissions. On July 19, 2006 Katherine Newell Bierman, Counterterrorism Counsel for the U.S. Program, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee, urging Congress to construct a system based on the UCMJ and MCM that respects the fair trial standards embodied in Common Article 3. She encouraged Congress to uphold the principles of fair justice and humane treatment and to win back the moral high ground that has long been the legacy of the United States' rule of law. Below are HRW's responses to follow up questions asked by the committee members.August 25, 2006.



  • Fair Trial StandardsThe Essential Components of a Fair Justice SystemAs Congress debates the future of Guantanamo military commissions after the Hamdan decision, Human Rights Watch has created a list of fair trial standards that make up the essential components of a fair justice system. Human Rights Watch has advocated that any tribunal established by this Congress should meet these minimum standards of fair trials.August 23, 2006.



  • Immunize Thyself The Bush administration's get out of jail card for torturers By John Sifton, senior researcher in terrorism and counterterrorismPublished in Slate If the Bush administration is still good at anything, it's this: distracting its opponents and seizing little victories from what might have been big defeats.August 11, 2006.



  • U.S.: Don’t Resurrect Discredited Guantanamo TribunalsAdministration Seeks Congressional Approval for Failed Detention Policy The Bush administration has proposed draft legislation that largely recreates the deeply flawed military commissions that the Supreme Court struck down last month in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, Human Rights Watch said today.July 28, 2006.



  • U.N. Challenges U.S. Rights Record Human Rights Committee Criticizes U.S. PracticesThe U.N. Human Rights Committee has issued a strongly worded critique of the U.S. government’s rights record at home and abroad, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch urges the United States to adopt the committee’s recommendations, which reflect a growing international consensus that the U.S. is violating basic human rights norms.July 27, 2006.



  • U.S.: Soldiers Tell of Detainee Abuse in IraqAbusive Techniques Were Authorized, Soldiers’ Complaints IgnoredTorture and other abuses against detainees in U.S. custody in Iraq were authorized and routine, even after the 2004 Abu Ghraib scandal, according to new accounts from soldiers in a Human Rights Watch report released today. The new report, containing first-hand accounts by U.S. military personnel interviewed by Human Rights Watch, details detainee abuses at an off-limits facility at Baghdad airport and at other detention centers throughout Iraq. July 23, 2006



  • "No Blood, No Foul"Soldiers' Accounts of Detainee Abuse in IraqTorture and other abuses against detainees in U.S. custody in Iraq were authorized and routine, even after the 2004 Abu Ghraib scandal, according to accounts from soldiers in this 53-page report. Soldiers describe how detainees were routinely subjected to severe beatings, painful stress positions, severe sleep deprivation, and exposure to extreme cold and hot temperatures. The accounts come from interviews conducted by Human Rights Watch, supplemented by memoranda and sworn statements contained in declassified documents.July 23, 2006 Report Download PDF,



  • Testimony on Military Commissions to the Senate Armed Services CommitteeKatherine Newell Bierman Testifies Before the Senate Armed Services CommitteeOn July 19, 2006, Katherine Newell Bierman, Counterterrorism Counsel, U.S. Program, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee on the military commissions in light of the Supreme Court decision in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld.July 19, 2006 Testimony



  • Letter to Foreign Ministers Regarding the EU Call to Close GuantanamoHuman Rights Watch commends the collective call by the European Union to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center that was made at the E.U.-U.S. summit last month. July 14, 2006



  • EU: Push U.S. To Close Guantanamo European governments should take concrete steps to help close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Human Rights Watch said today in a letter sent to EU foreign ministers, sent to EU foreign ministers.July 14, 2006

2. Resumen del Informe “los Desaparecidos” de los Estados Unidos. 2004

Algunos han argumentado que ¿por qué debemos preocuparnos por lo que les pase? Primero, porque a pesar de la información vital que se ha extraído a algunos de estos sospechosos, en general el trato dispensado por Estados Unidos a estos prisioneros ha provocado un impulso en lugar de un declive para al-Qaeda y ha hecho por lo tanto del mundo un lugar menos seguro frente al terrorismo. ... Segundo, porque la tortura y la “desaparición” de los adversarios de Estados Unidos invita a todos los gobiernos poco saludables del mundo a seguir su ejemplo—de hecho, países que van de Sudán a Zimbabwe ya han citado Abu Ghraib y otras acciones de Estados Unidos para justificar sus propias prácticas y atemperar las críticas. ... Pero la principal preocupación debe concentrarse sobre todo en la aceptación de métodos que son la antitesis de una democracia y traicionan la identidad de Estados Unidos como país respetuoso de la ley.


Resumen del Informe

“Se llevaron al prisionero en medio de la noche hace 19 meses. Lo encapucharon y lo trasladaron a un lugar secreto y no se ha sabido de él desde entonces. Se ha informado de que los interrogadores utilizaron niveles graduales de fuerza con el prisionero, lo que incluyó la técnica del sumergimiento en agua—conocida en América Latina como el “submarino”—por la que se ata y se fuerza bajo el agua al detenido, haciéndole creer que puede ahogarse. También se llevaron a sus hijos de siete y nueve años, presuntamente para inducirle a hablar. Estas tácticas son demasiado comunes para las dictaduras opresoras. Sin embargo, los interrogadores no procedían de una dictadura, sino de la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) de Estados Unidos. El prisionero de Estados Unidos es Khalid Shaikh Muhammad, presunto arquitecto principal de los atentados del 11 de Septiembre. Muhammad es uno entre alrededor de una docena de altos mandos de al-Qaeda que simplemente han “desaparecido” en manos de Estados Unidos. Después de los atentados del 11 de Septiembre contra Estados Unidos, la Administración Bush ha violado las normas legales más fundamentales en su trato a los detenidos por razones de seguridad.


Muchos han sido recluidos en prisiones en el extranjero, la más conocida de las cuales se encuentra en la Bahía de Guantánamo, Cuba. Como sabemos ahora, prisioneros sospechosos de terrorismo, y muchos sobre los que no existe ninguna prueba en contra, han sido maltratados, humillados y torturados. Pero quizá ninguna práctica cuestione tan esencialmente los fundamentos del derecho estadounidense e internacional que la detención secreta e incomunicada durante períodos prolongados en “lugares sin desvelar” de presuntos miembros de al-Qaeda. Las “desapariciones” fueron un abuso característico de las dictaduras militares latinoamericanas en su “guerra sucia” contra la presunta subversión. Ahora se han convertido en la táctica de Estados Unidos en su combate contra al-Qaeda.


Entre los prisioneros “desaparecidos” por la CIA se encuentran Abu Zubayda, estrecho colaborador de Osama bin Laden, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, que de no haber sido rechazada su visa de entrada a Estados Unidos podría haber sido uno de los secuestradores del 11 de Septiembre, Hambali, aliado clave de al-Qaeda en el Sudeste de Asia, y Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, presuntamente el cerebro detrás del atentado con bomba contra el U.S.S. Cole.


Según el Panel Independiente para Revisar las Operaciones de Detención del Departamento de Defensa, presidido por el ex Secretario de Defensa James Schlesinger, se ha permitido a la CIA que “opere con reglas diferentes” a las de las Fuerzas Armadas de Estados Unidos. Dichas reglas están inspiradas en parte en un memorando del Departamento de Justicia de agosto de 2002, en respuesta a una petición de orientación de la CIA, en el que se decía que torturar a detenidos de al-Qaeda “podría estar justificado” y que las leyes internacionales contra la tortura “podrían ser inconstitucionales si se aplicaban a los interrogatorios” realizados en el contexto de la guerra contra el terrorismo.


De hecho, se ha informado que algunos de los detenidos, como Khalid Shaikh Muhammad, han sido torturados durante la reclusión. Se ha dicho que muchos han ofrecido información de inteligencia valiosa que ha servido para frustrar planes y salvar vidas. Se dice que algunos han mentido bajo presión para complacer a sus captores.(Ibn al-Shaikh al-Libi se inventó aparentemente la acusación, que fue presentada posteriormente por el Secretario de Estado Colin Powell ante las Naciones Unidas, de que Irak había ofrecido entrenamiento sobre “venenos y gases letales” a al-Qaeda.) Estados Unidos ha reconocido la detención de muchos, pero no de todos.


Lo que todos los detenidos tienen en común es que Estados Unidos se ha negado a revelar su paradero y permitirles el acceso a sus familiares, a abogados o al Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja. No son buenas personas, por decir algo. Se les acusa de cometer los actos criminales más diabólicos. Algunos han argumentado que ¿por qué debemos preocuparnos por lo que les pase? Primero, porque a pesar de la información vital que se ha extraído a algunos de estos sospechosos, en general el trato dispensado por Estados Unidos a estos prisioneros ha provocado un impulso en lugar de un declive para al-Qaeda y ha hecho por lo tanto del mundo un lugar menos seguro frente al terrorismo.


Como reconoció la Comisión del 11 de Septiembre: “Las acusaciones de que Estados Unidos maltrató a prisioneros bajo su custodia ha dificultado la creación de las alianzas diplomáticas, políticas y militares que necesitará el gobierno”. Segundo, porque la tortura y la “desaparición” de los adversarios de Estados Unidos invita a todos los gobiernos poco saludables del mundo a seguir su ejemplo—de hecho, países que van de Sudán a Zimbabwe ya han citado Abu Ghraib y otras acciones de Estados Unidos para justificar sus propias prácticas y atemperar las críticas.


Pero la principal preocupación debe concentrarse sobre todo en la aceptación de métodos que son la antitesis de una democracia y traicionan la identidad de Estados Unidos como país respetuoso de la ley. Aparentemente, para al-Qaeda el fin justifica los medios, medios que han incluido estrellar aviones secuestrados contra edificios y colocar bombas en estaciones de trenes y lugares de culto. Estados Unidos no debe adoptar esta lógica.


Estados Unidos está dedicado, como tiene que ser, a la defensa de su territorio y su pueblo contra los ataques de al-Qaeda y sus aliados. Human Rights Watch reconoce, por supuesto, la importancia de reunir inteligencia de manera eficaz y rápida para poder seguir la pista de al-Qaeda y otras redes, capturar a otros terroristas e intervenir en prevención de más atentados terroristas de catastróficas consecuencias.


Sin embargo, el uso de las desapariciones forzadas y la detención secreta e incomunicada vulnera los principios más fundamentales de una sociedad libre. Cuando Argentina torturó y “desapareció” a presuntos disidentes en nombre del combate contra los que calificó de “terroristas”, obró mal.


Cuando Estados Unidos tortura y “desaparece” a presuntos terroristas, incluso los sospechosos de tramar los atentados más terribles, también está obrando mal. El hecho de que el terrorismo que está combatiendo Estados Unidos tenga características diferentes no cambia el carácter ilícito de los métodos empleados para combatirlo.


En este informe se ofrece una revisión exhaustiva de lo que sabemos sobre los “desaparecidos” de Estados Unidos, y se incluye un apéndice con los hechos detallados de siete casos sobre los que se dispone de cierta información. Es muy probable que haya varios o muchos más detenidos de este tipo. En el informe también se presenta el contexto histórico sobre las “desapariciones”, remontándose a sus orígenes en la Alemania Nazi durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y se identifican las disposiciones específicas dentro del derecho estadounidense e internacional que prohíben esta práctica."


Solidarios y vigilantes


Hasta la próxima


7 comentarios:

Antonio dijo...

Disculpe mi incredulidad. Creo que lo que más me serviría a mí, sería información de HRW que critique el accionar de la oposición venezolana. Por ejemplo, cuando le dieron el golpe de estado a Hugo Chavez y los medios de prensa venezolanos decidieron no transmitir el golpe. Algunos canales pasaron dibujitos animados. Cosas de ese tipo a denunciado que a mi entender van contra la libertad de expresion, han sido denunciadas?

Espero que eso no se entienda como que uno apoye o no apoye al gobierno de Chavez.

Por lo presentqado, al menos no parece ser una organizacion comandada por washington jeje xD, pero no voy a mentir diciendo que no me quedan algunas dudas, como la expuesta arriba.

Porfas si maneja esa información, le agradecería que me la pase (en serio se lo agradecería).

Atte
Antonio

miguel dijo...

Pucha Antonio, todos sabemos lo importante que Human Rights Watch fue en la lucha contra Pinochet, por ejemplo.

Susana Villarán dijo...

Antonio, te agradezco lapregunta. es no sólo pertinente sino justa. HRW se pronunció contra el Golpe de abril del 2002. Lo hizo también la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos en esa ocasión.

Transcribo el comunicado de Human Rigths Watch y Wola sobre el Golpe y acera de las tensiones y polarización posterior al Golpe. Saca tus conclusiones.

La crisis política de Venezuela

Una declaración conjunta de Washington Office on Latin America y HRW

9 de octubre de 2002
“En los últimos meses, tanto Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) como Human Rights Watch han emprendido misiones de averiguación a Venezuela para investigar los acontecimientos que rodearon el golpe fallido de abril de 2002 y evaluar la situación actual de los derechos humanos y la crisis política continuada. Compartimos graves preocupaciones por la estabilidad política de Venezuela y tememos que siguen habiendo altas probabilidades de que estalle la violencia a gran escala. La comunidad internacional debe mantenerse vigilante ante los riesgos continuados que amenazan hoy en día a los derechos humanos, la democracia y el régimen constitucional en Venezuela. Apelamos a la comunidad internacional, y al Gobierno de Estados Unidos en particular, para que apoye las iniciativas emprendidas en Venezuela para promover una resolución negociada y pacífica del actual impasse político dentro del marco constitucional venezolano y el Estado de derecho, lo que incluye un cumplimiento estricto de los principios de derechos humanos.

La situación posterior al golpe fallido continúa polarizada y la tensión está a niveles sumamente elevados. Los sectores de línea dura tanto de la oposición como del Gobierno han demostrado muy poca voluntad de compromiso o negociación. Ambos recurren a la retórica inflamatoria y la confrontación, creando condiciones que podrían producir más violencia. Algunos sectores de la oposición siguen tratando de desbancar al Presidente Chávez antes de que termine su mandato, con bastante desprecio a la legalidad o la constitucionalidad para lograr dicho objetivo. El gobierno de Chávez, por su parte, no ha adoptado suficientes medidas para apaciguar el conflicto actual e imponer el Estado de derecho, y continúa promoviendo la participación política dentro del Gobierno de miembros en activo de las fuerzas armadas venezolanas.
La situación de la prensa también es preocupante. En lugar de informar con imparcialidad y exactitud, la mayoría de los medios de comunicación intentan provocar el descontento y la irritación populares en apoyo a la línea dura de la oposición. El Presidente Chávez, a su vez, emplea un fuerte lenguaje intimidatorio para atacar verbalmente a los medios de comunicación. Dada la polarización de la situación, sus simpatizantes pueden interpretar sus declaraciones como una incitación a la violencia. El resultado es una situación precaria para los periodistas, quienes suelen ser atacados y hostigados.”

Declaración adicional de José Miguel Vivanco

“Durante el golpe de estado de 2002, la Carta Democrática fue crucial en la movilización de los estados miembros de la OEA que condenaron estos hechos contribuyendo a restaurar el orden constitucional. La Carta ayudó a salvar la democracia venezolana de los enemigos de Chávez durante el golpe de 2002", dijo Vivanco.

Antonio dijo...

Okas, muchas gracias por darse el tiempo. Después de haber leido lo último creo ya tener una opinión al respecto.

Anónimo dijo...

el mercurio de ayer, IMPERDIBLE entrevista a Jose Miguel Vivanco, lider de HRW:
http://diario.elmercurio.com/2008/09/28/
reportajes/_portada/noticias/4109DB33-EDD5-4114-A6BC-49C33695E540.htm?id={4109DB33-EDD5-4114-A6BC-49C33695E540}

No lo vayan a expulsar de EE.UU. ahora...
-Esto no es primera vez que lo digo, y lo hemos documentado. He tenido muchas dificultades también en Colombia, un país gobernado por el Presidente Uribe. Tiene un signo ideológico opuesto al Presidente Chávez, pero con una intolerancia a la crítica es igual a la de Chávez. Uribe me ha descalificado como colaborador de la guerrilla de las FARC. Uribe es el principal aliado estratégico de Bush.

-También lo acusan de estar vendido a EE.UU...
-Cada uno es libre de decir lo que quiera. Pero si revisan antecedentes, verán que tanto mi trayectoria como la de HRW son absolutamente impecables.

-Si Bush no respeta los DD.HH., ¿por qué no lo denuncian?
-Constantemente estamos acusando a Estados Unidos por las agresiones a los inmigrantes, la aplicación de la pena de muerte, casos de brutalidad policial, abusos en las prisiones, discriminación racial. A partir del ataque a las Torres Gemelas, toda la política de Bush se ha dado con una profunda falta de respeto a los DD.HH. incluyendo torturas, desapariciones forzadas...

-¿Fuera del país?
-Guantánamo, técnicamente, no es territorio norteamericano, y han escogido ese terreno para, desde allí, mantener a un grupo de prisioneros sin hábeas corpus.

"Hemos tenido problemas de seguridad, personas nuestras detenidas por unas horas, fundamentalmente ante gobiernos dictatoriales en otras regiones del mundo; pero expulsiones, ninguna. HRW cubre África, Asia, el Medio Oriente, Europa, y jamás había ocurido que a la hora de dar a conocer el informe se expulsara por la fuerza a los informantes".

hugo dijo...

Muy buenos dias,

me llamo Hugo Zunzarren y soy un estudiante de la escuela de Guerra Economica de paris y estoy realizando un informe sobre la Estrategia y tactica del Gobierno Venezolano tanto en el plano nacional, sudamericano o intenacional.

Realmente necesitaria la ayuda de algun experto en la materia.

les agradezco de antemano su ayuda y quedo a su disposicion para cualquier complemento de informacion

cordialmente

Hugo Zunzarren

hugo dijo...

Muy buenos dias,

me llamo Hugo Zunzarren y soy un estudiante de la escuela de Guerra Economica de paris y estoy realizando un informe sobre la Estrategia y tactica del Gobierno Venezolano tanto en el plano nacional, sudamericano o intenacional.

Realmente necesitaria la ayuda de algun experto en la materia.

les agradezco de antemano su ayuda y quedo a su disposicion para cualquier complemento de informacion

cordialmente

Hugo Zunzarren